Second Chances Resource Library

The Second Chances Resource Library contains resources related to expanding release opportunities
for people in prison who are serving long sentences or have other circumstances warranting release

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Found 194 resources
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PDF STATEMENT FROM THE SPONSORS OF SB43, A BILL TO BAN LIFE WITHOUT PAROLE FOR CHILDREN

Organization/Publisher:Source NM

This is a statement from the sponsors of a New Mexico bill, SB43, which would to ban life without parole for juveniles and create early parole for those serving long adult sentences for crimes committed as children.

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PDF Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist Letter in Support of SB 43

Organization/Publisher:ACLU NM
Author:George Davis

This is a letter written by George Davis, a child and adolescent psychiatrist, in support of a New Mexico bill to ban life without parole for juveniles and create early parole for those serving long adult sentences for crimes committed as children.

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PDF District Attorney in Support of SB247 (Juvenile Life Sentences w/o Parole)

Organization/Publisher:ACLU NM
Author:Mary Carmack-Altwies

This is a letter written by New Mexico First Judicial District Attorney Mary Carmack-Altwies in support of a New Mexico bill that would ban life without parole for juveniles and create early parole for those serving long adult sentences for crimes committed as children.

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PDF Statement of Survivors and Family Members of Victims of Youth Violence in Support of Abolishing Life without the Possibility of Parole and Creating Parole Eligibility After 15 Years for Children

Organization/Publisher:The Campaign for the Fair Sentencing of Youth
Author:Rukiye Abdul-Mutakallim, Srletta Evans, Paul LaRuffa, Isa Nichols, and Linda White

This statement was written by survivors and family members of youth violence in support of a New Mexico bill to ban life without parole for juveniles and create early parole for those serving long adult sentences for crimes committed as children.

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PDF An eye on reform: Examining decisions, procedures, and outcomes of the Oregon Board of Parole and Post-Prison Supervision release process

Organization/Publisher:Lewis & Clark Law School and Portland State University
Author:Dr. Chris Campbell, Professor Aliza Kaplan, Mieke de Vrind

In an effort to empirically explore and identify potential areas of reform that might exist in the Oregon Board of Parole and Post-Prison Supervision (the Board) release process hearings and decision-making process, the Criminal Justice Reform Clinic at Lewis & Clark Law School (CJRC) launched a project funded by Arnold Ventures in November of 2020. This project aimed to understand how incarcerated potential parolees (petitioners) and parolees in the community are impacted by the Board’s process using a large-scale mixed method (qualitative and quantitative) research study. Moreover, the purpose of the study is also to examine how the Board’s decisions and processes may be related to certain outcomes (e.g., initial release and supervision failure). Where possible, special attention is given to differences in race/ethnicity of the parolee and subsequent outcomes of decisions and supervisions. 

The key research goals of this study were to (1) determine if there are any patterns in Board decisions to release an eligible person to parole supervision, (2) determine if there are any differences across cases brought before the Board, (3) identify how the hearing and decision-making process impact eligible parties/parolees, and (4) examine the degree to which release decisions are accurate in determining a parolee’s likelihood to reoffend. Below are summaries of each goal and a brief overview of the takeaway messages from each section. 

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PDF Racial Disparities in Lifer Parole Outcomes: The Hidden Role of Professional Evaluations

Organization/Publisher:Law & Social Inquiry
Author:Kathryne M. Young and Jessica Pearlman

One in seven people in prison in the US is serving a life sentence, and most of these people will eventually be eligible for discretionary parole release. Yet parole hearings are notoriously understudied. With only a handful of exceptions, few researchers have considered the ways in which race shapes decision-makers’ perception of parole candidates. We use a data set created from over seven hundred California lifer parole hearing transcripts to examine the factors that predict parole commissioners’ decisions. We find significant racial disparities in outcomes, with Black parole candidates less likely to receive parole grants than white parole candidates, and test two possible indirect mechanisms. First, we find that racial disparity is unassociated with differences in rehabilitative efforts of Black versus white parole candidates, suggesting that differential levels of self-rehabilitation are not responsible for the disparity. Second, we test the hypothesis that racial disparity owes to commissioners’ reliance on other professionals’ determinations: psychological assessments, behavioral judgments, and prosecutors’ recommendations. We find that reliance on these evaluations accounts for a significant portion of the observed racial disparity. These results suggest that inclusion of professional assessments is not race-neutral and may create a veneer of objectivity that masks racial inequality.

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LINK Young and Incarcerated: Life sentences for people who aren’t yet 18

Organization/Publisher:Source NM
Author:Marisa Demarco

This is a five part series on New Mexico’s juvenile sentencing laws and proposed bill to ban juvenile life without parole. The series features the story of Santana Serrano, who is serving a life sentence for a murder committed by her then-boyfriend when she was 17.

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